Poems to Learn By Heart

Press (Click) to reveal information and press again to hide it.

This site makes extensive use of a simple (Click) for revealing information. Pressing (Click) again will then hide it.

What's it all about then? (Click).

It’s good for your brain to learn some things by heart, and it is very satisfying to be able to recite by heart a few poems. Of course you should look to do so with poems that resonate with you or maybe ones you vaguely remember from your younger days. The following are a few popular poems that many people get a satisfaction out of learning by heart.

Each poem is given twice. The first time is the full poem for you to read through as you initially seek to learn it by heart. The second time uses (Click)s to reveal a couple of lines at a time. This enables you to test yourself as you gradually learn the poem bit by bit.

Unless you’ve got a remarkably good memory you’re unlikely to learn a poem by heart in a single sitting. However if you keep coming back on a regular basis you’ll find yourself being able to remember it, even if you consider yourself to have a bad memory. You should however top up the memory from time to time because it will fade if you don’t do so. Once having learnt it however, even if you seemingly forget it, you will find yourself quickly able to relearn it.

Learn By Heart Apps

If
by Rudyard Kipling

(Click)
If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
If
by Rudyard Kipling

(Click)
If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
(Click)
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
(Click)
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
(Click)
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

(Click)
If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
(Click)
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
(Click)
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
(Click)
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

(Click)
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
(Click)
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
(Click)
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
(Click)
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

(Click)
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
(Click)
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
(Click)
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
(Click)
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
The Owl and the Pussy-Cat
by Edward Lear

(Click)
I
The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
"O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are,
You are,
You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!"

II
Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl!
How charmingly sweet you sing!
O let us be married! too long we have tarried:
But what shall we do for a ring?"
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the Bong-Tree grows
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood
With a ring at the end of his nose,
His nose,
His nose,
With a ring at the end of his nose.

III
"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will."
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon,
The moon,
The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.
The Owl and the Pussy-Cat
by Edward Lear

(Click)
I
The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat,
(Click)
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
(Click)
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
(Click)
"O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are,
You are,
You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!"

II
(Click)
Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl!
How charmingly sweet you sing!
(Click)
O let us be married! too long we have tarried:
But what shall we do for a ring?"
(Click)
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the Bong-Tree grows
(Click)
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood
With a ring at the end of his nose,
His nose,
His nose,
With a ring at the end of his nose.

III
(Click)
"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will."
(Click)
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
(Click)
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
(Click)
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon,
The moon,
The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.
The Tyger
by William Blake

(Click)
Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat.
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp.
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears
And water'd heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?
The Tyger
by William Blake

(Click)
Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night; (Click)
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

(Click)
In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
(Click)
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

(Click)
And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
(Click)
And when thy heart began to beat.
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

(Click)
What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
(Click)
What the anvil? what dread grasp.
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

(Click)
When the stars threw down their spears
And water'd heaven with their tears:
(Click)
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

(Click)
Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
(Click)
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
by William Wordsworth

(Click)
I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
by William Wordsworth

(Click)
I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
(Click)
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
(Click)
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

(Click)
Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
(Click)
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
(Click)
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

(Click)
The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
(Click)
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
(Click)
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

(Click)
For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
(Click)
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
(Click)
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.
The Charge of the Light Brigade
by Alfred Lord Tennyson

(Click)
I
Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
“Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!” he said.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

II
“Forward, the Light Brigade!”
Was there a man dismayed?
Not though the soldier knew
Someone had blundered.
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

III
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volleyed and thundered;
Stormed at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of hell
Rode the six hundred.

IV
Flashed all their sabres bare,
Flashed as they turned in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wondered.
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right through the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reeled from the sabre stroke
Shattered and sundered.
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.

V
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volleyed and thundered;
Stormed at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell.
They that had fought so well
Came through the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

VI
When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wondered.
Honour the charge they made!
Honour the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!
The Charge of the Light Brigade
by Alfred Lord Tennyson

(Click)
I
Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
(Click)
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
(Click)
“Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!” he said.
(Click)
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

II
(Click)
“Forward, the Light Brigade!”
Was there a man dismayed?
(Click)
Not though the soldier knew
Someone had blundered.
(Click)
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.
(Click)
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

III
(Click)
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volleyed and thundered;
(Click)
Stormed at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
(Click)
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of hell
Rode the six hundred.

IV
(Click)
Flashed all their sabres bare,
Flashed as they turned in air
Sabring the gunners there,
(Click)
Charging an army, while
All the world wondered.
(Click)
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right through the line they broke;
(Click)
Cossack and Russian
Reeled from the sabre stroke
Shattered and sundered.
(Click)
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.

V
(Click)
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volleyed and thundered;
(Click)
Stormed at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell.
(Click)
They that had fought so well
Came through the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of hell,
(Click)
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

VI
(Click)
When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wondered.
(Click)
Honour the charge they made!
Honour the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!
Far Over The Misty Mountains Cold
by J.R.R. Tolkien.

(Click)
Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away ere break of day
To seek the pale enchanted gold.

The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gleaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.

On silver necklaces they strung
The flowering stars, on crowns they hung
The dragon-fire, in twisted wire
They meshed the light of moon and sun.

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away, ere break of day,
To claim our long-forgotten gold.

Goblets they carved there for themselves
And harps of gold; where no man delves
There lay they long, and many a song
Was sung unheard by men or elves.

The pines were roaring on the height,
The winds were moaning in the night.
The fire was red, it flaming spread;
The trees like torches blazed with light.

The bells were ringing in the dale
And men looked up with faces pale;
Then dragon’s ire more fierce than fire
Laid low their towers and houses frail.

The mountain smoked beneath the moon;
The dwarves, they heard the tramp of doom.
They fled their hall, to dying fall
Beneath his feet, beneath the moon.

Far over the misty mountains grim
To dungeons deep and caverns dim
We must away, ere break of day,
To win our harps and gold from him!
Far Over The Misty Mountains Cold
by J.R.R. Tolkien.

(Click)
Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
(Click)
We must away ere break of day
To seek the pale enchanted gold.

(Click)
The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
(Click)
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

(Click)
For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gleaming golden hoard
(Click)
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.

(Click)
On silver necklaces they strung
The flowering stars, on crowns they hung
(Click)
The dragon-fire, in twisted wire
They meshed the light of moon and sun.

(Click)
Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
(Click)
We must away, ere break of day,
To claim our long-forgotten gold.

(Click)
Goblets they carved there for themselves
And harps of gold; where no man delves
(Click)
There lay they long, and many a song
Was sung unheard by men or elves.

(Click)
The pines were roaring on the height,
The winds were moaning in the night.
(Click)
The fire was red, it flaming spread;
The trees like torches blazed with light.

(Click)
The bells were ringing in the dale
And men looked up with faces pale;
(Click)
Then dragon’s ire more fierce than fire
Laid low their towers and houses frail.

(Click)
The mountain smoked beneath the moon;
The dwarves, they heard the tramp of doom.
(Click)
They fled their hall, to dying fall
Beneath his feet, beneath the moon.

(Click)
Far over the misty mountains grim
To dungeons deep and caverns dim
(Click)
We must away, ere break of day,
To win our harps and gold from him!
Auguries of Innocence
by William Blake
(First 34 lines)

(Click)
To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour
A Robin Red breast in a Cage
Puts all Heaven in a Rage
A Dove house filld with Doves & Pigeons
Shudders Hell thr' all its regions
A dog starvd at his Masters Gate
Predicts the ruin of the State
A Horse misusd upon the Road
Calls to Heaven for Human blood
Each outcry of the hunted Hare
A fibre from the Brain does tear
A Skylark wounded in the wing
A Cherubim does cease to sing
The Game Cock clipd & armd for fight
Does the Rising Sun affright
Every Wolfs & Lions howl
Raises from Hell a Human Soul
The wild deer, wandring here & there
Keeps the Human Soul from Care
The Lamb misusd breeds Public Strife
And yet forgives the Butchers knife
The Bat that flits at close of Eve
Has left the Brain that wont Believe
The Owl that calls upon the Night
Speaks the Unbelievers fright
He who shall hurt the little Wren
Shall never be belovd by Men
He who the Ox to wrath has movd
Shall never be by Woman lovd
The wanton Boy that kills the Fly
Shall feel the Spiders enmity
Auguries of Innocence
by William Blake
(First 34 lines)

(Click)
To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
(Click)
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour
(Click)
A Robin Red breast in a Cage
Puts all Heaven in a Rage
(Click)
A Dove house filld with Doves & Pigeons
Shudders Hell thr' all its regions
(Click)
A dog starvd at his Masters Gate
Predicts the ruin of the State
(Click)
A Horse misusd upon the Road
Calls to Heaven for Human blood
(Click)
Each outcry of the hunted Hare
A fibre from the Brain does tear
(Click)
A Skylark wounded in the wing
A Cherubim does cease to sing
(Click)
The Game Cock clipd & armd for fight
Does the Rising Sun affright
(Click)
Every Wolfs & Lions howl
Raises from Hell a Human Soul
(Click)
The wild deer, wandring here & there
Keeps the Human Soul from Care
(Click)
The Lamb misusd breeds Public Strife
And yet forgives the Butchers knife
(Click)
The Bat that flits at close of Eve
Has left the Brain that wont Believe
(Click)
The Owl that calls upon the Night
Speaks the Unbelievers fright
(Click)
He who shall hurt the little Wren
Shall never be belovd by Men
(Click)
He who the Ox to wrath has movd
Shall never be by Woman lovd
(Click)
The wanton Boy that kills the Fly
Shall feel the Spiders enmity